Famous Artists Of Black And White Portraits

Famous Artists Of Black And White Portraits

Discovering The World of Black And White
Before the 20th Century, artists were restricted in using black and white. The simple reason for this is that color was not invented yet. By this, I mean that color was not an element or function within film or photographic works until the 20th Century. Therefore, artists were using black and white because they had no other choice. However, the interesting thing to consider is the way in which black and white artists chose to render photographs when color was available. For instance, Robert Mapplethorpe continued to use black and white film even when color was available at film stores. In addition, Andy Warhol stuck to black and white throughout the '60s and '70s.

The Way An Artists Chooses Black And White Over Color
Many artists choose black and white for the immediate contrast and contradiction within the frame. In this way, the artist confronts the image with sharp lines, contrast, shade and shadow. Immediately, one can see the difference and effects that are self-evident in black and white photography. This stark point of view is still popular in the art world today.
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The Beginning Of Graphic Art And Its Many Uses

Graphic art started when someone painted hunting scenes on a cave wall. These images, discovered in France, changed how the world thinks about art history. They depict scenes from ancient life and are the earliest images discovered. Since the beginning of graphic art, there have been many changes as different styles developed, including written language.

Most written language relies on a graphic of some sort. Languages like Chinese and Japanese use pictograms, which are pictures that communicate an idea. However, languages like English use phonograms, where each symbol represents a particular sound. Written language, then, is a form of graphic art specifically designed for communication. This is most evident in the case of heiroglyphics such as the Ancient Egyptian alphabet.

The "letters as pictures" philosophy led to the development of a form of art called typography. It is used to communicate ideas from personal expression to advertising and propaganda. Graphic art is responsible for everything from clipart to magazine design, and is one of the most widely used art forms.
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Famous Artists Who Used Colored Pencils

In the world of artistic mediums, colored pencils is a relatively new contender. Along with acrylic paints, the use of colored pencils was not a widespread practice until after 1950. Accordingly, none of the infamous artists of history produced any great masterpieces in this medium. However, one can argue that the colored pencils have their roots in the popularization of graphite, chalks, and various types of pastels.

These mediums were of great importance to artists such as Degas.Want more? Click here/tag Many of the sketches produced by this Impressionist artists were done with this material because of the bright colors that he could achieve and the texture he could produce when working with "pastel" color schemes. His sketches and drawings of women and ballet dancers were some of the first works produced that could hold their own beside paintings with the same level of sophistication.

Colored pencils are now widely used, and artists are producing work with this medium of stunning detail and integrity. The work comes in all sizes and portrays all types of subject matter. Colored pencil technology is far from being at a standstill either. Artists can now buy colored pencils that double as watercolor mediums when dipped into liquids. The Colored Pencil Society of America was founded in 1990 to show and support the artists currently working in colored pencil. A list of relevant artist who exclusively use this medium might include Allan Servoss, Gary Greene, and Ann Kulberg. The work of these artists can be located online.

Take the Risk Out of Your Home for Cheaper Insurance

The main thing that home insurance providers look at when it comes to setting a price for insurance on a particular home is risk. Risk is at the core of any type of insurance because you are basically insuring your property against a possible disaster in the future. If your home is more prone to risk, then you will have to pay high home insurance bills on a monthly basis. There are many different ways to lower the amount that you have to pay for home insurance, but one of the best ways to lower the price is to also lower the risk factors that are found in your home. Once you have managed the risk in your home, you can then go to pennsylvaniahomeinsurance.com to get the plan that you need. Let's take a look at some of the risk factors that home insurance providers will consider when it comes to your home.

Are There Any Smokers in the House?

Smoking is something that will definitely increase your health insurance costs, but most people do not know that this bad habit can also increase the cost of their home insurance. In addition to being a risky habit for your health, a smoker also increases the risk of their house being set on fire at some point in the future. If you want to be able to lower the number of possible fire hazards in your home, then you may want to throw your smoking habit to the curb.

How is the Structural Integrity of Your Home?

One thing that most home insurance providers definitely want to know about is the structural integrity of your home. They will not want to insure a home that is about to fall apart, so make sure that you make the necessary renovations before you send in your application. As long as everything is up to code and you do not have any faulty wires hanging out of the walls, you should be able to get the insurance that you need.

Avoid the Dangerous Weather

Whether you are dodging hurricanes, tornadoes or snow storms, it's important to stay away from the power of mother nature as much as possible. It does not make much sense to live in an area that has a number of risk factors when it comes to possible damage to buildings, so make sure that you keep this in mind if you have a choice when it comes to where you live.
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The History Of Rembrandt And His Paintings

The Dutch have produced some quality paintings over the years, but few have been as illustrious as Rembrandt has. Born in 1606 in Leiden, currently in the Netherlands, he worked up through 1669. His career was none both for its specialization in print (and he is considered one of the print masters of European history), as well as for the personal tragedy in his life.

Rembrandt first obtained popularity and success in his younger years as a result of his prints. He remained popular throughout his life but still managed to have significant financial problems over the remainder of his life.

Working in Amsterdam for a significant portion of his life, Rembrandt married Saskia van Uylenburg in 1634. They had four children, but only the fourth was able to survive until they reached their adult years. Furthmore, Saskia became sick and died at a young age. Rembrandt was devastated by this and painted many pictures of her final days in her sick bed, some of which represent his most renowed and touching work.

He passed away in 1669 one year after his son died. Rembrandt is remembered for several different stages of his work including portraits and landscapes, as well as various narratives that are evident in his work.
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Leonardo da Vince’s Famous Art Work

Of course everyone has heard of Leonardo da Vinci's famous painting The Mona Lisa; which the painting technique called sfumato was used. This particular technique is what created Mona Lisa's breathtaking smile. Although the identity of the women in the picture has never documented, it's believed to be Lisa Gheradin; the wife of a local merchant. It has also been presumed that the reason for her notorious smile in the painting is due to her possibly being pregnant.
More of Leonardo de' Vinci's famous art work is as follows:
The Annunciation, Tobias and the Angel, The Baptism of Christ, Ginevra de' Benci, The Modonna of the Carnation, Modonna with a Flower, The Adoration of the Magi, St. Jerome in the Wilderness, The Virgin of the Rocks, Portrait of a Musician, Portrait of a Woman, Portrait of Cecilic Gallerani, Madonna Litta, and of course the Infamous Last Supper to just list a few.
Although many reproductions of these painting can be viewed in most art galleries around the world; traveling to Italy where Leonardo de' Vinci actually created some of his most astounding paintings is probably the most breathtaking adventure in the realm of his historical artwork.
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Petroglyphs Are An Art Of Their Own

Carving images into stone is one of the oldest, most universal forms of art and communication known to man. Petroglyphs can be found on various parts of every continent except for Antarctica. They can be any size, from a single, square inch to acres of carved stone.

The word "petroglyph" comes from the Greek petra, meaning "stone," and glyphein, meaning "to carve." To qualify a petroglyph, the work must be carved, scraped, picked, engraved, or any other method that physically alters the stone's surface. If it is merely painted or drawn, the work is considered a pictogram. Generally speaking, it must also be a flat image placed upon the stone, not a three dimensional object, otherwise it is a sculpture.

Let's not make this a simple art history lesson. Petroglyphs are still relevant to the modern artist. Instead of carving that huge stone you ordered into a statue, use it as a canvas. Dig up, wash off, and start chipping away at that big hunk of granite you keep tripping over in the yard. Carve images into a few small stones and make beads out of them. Make a mosaic of etched stones. Think outside the rocks!
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The Different Leads In Drawing Pencils

The drawing pencil comes in many brands, with different types of lead. Generally, each pencil has a mixture of graphite and filler referred to as lead. The ratio of graphite to filler determines the hardness of the lead. The harder the lead, the lighter the line the pencil will make. The most common lead hardness is HB, what is commonly called the 2 pencil.

As most people using art pencils know, each different brand of pencil has different thicknesses and hardness of lead. Even the ubiquitous 2 pencil is vastly different in hardness from brand to brand. Thicker leads are better for thick lines and shading. A good thick lead can create a varying width line. Varying the hardness of lead gives more detail to a drawing.

Depending on the brand, art pencils will have hardness ratings from 4H to 4B or more, with HB in the middle. There are many variations depending on brand. However, B hardness refers to a softer lead that has more graphite. A 6B pencil will have the softest lead and produce the darkest line. The hardest lead will produce very light lines on the paper, making it better for light details, tracing, and sketching.
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Famous Artists Who Used Pastel Chalks

Leonardo Da Vinci was the first artist to use pastel chalks. Da Vinci painted Isabelle de Este, the Duchess of Mantina in 1499.

The first regular use began with Rosalba Carriera (1675-1757) in the first half of the 18th century. Before long, pastel became almost the only fashionable form of splendid portraiture. A.R. Mengs (1728-1779), J.M. Nattier (1685-1766), J.B.S. Chardin (1699-1779), Maurice Quentin de la Tour (1704-1788), Louis Tocque (1696-1772), Hubert Drouais (1699-1767), and J.B. Perronneau (1715-1783) were at the top of the field.

When the French Revolution happened, pastel portraits were often life size.

La Tour and Perronneau created paintings with the same brilliance and delicacy that the portraits of J.B. Greuze (1725-1805) or J.L. David (1748-1825) have. Jean Etienne Liotard (1702-1789) painted groups and types.

William Hoare of Bath (1707-1799), Francis Cotes (1725-1770), and John Russell (1745-1806) were famous English painters of the classical pastel style.

Edgar Degas (1834-1917) used a mixture of colors that were like the late Gothic and early Renaissance tempera with the same quality of hue and saturated color.

Degas transformed pastels into the brilliance of opposites of dark and light that was similar to oil paintings of Camille Pissaro, Paul Gauguin, and himself. You thought this was good? Brace yourself: Ce que l'on ne voit plus que dans sa mmoire
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